Native American Fetishes – Old and New

Zuni Fetishes and Carvings

Old and New

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All tribes in the Southwest US make small stone carvings. Sacred ones are called fetishes. The Pueblo Indians have developed the use of these carvings and it is the Zuni that are the most skillful stone carvers of the Pueblos. Evidence of fetish use has been documented to pre-Columbian times. Columbian times refer to those that occurred after European influence, or after Columbus landed in the Americas in 1492.

While there were only a few dozen Zuni carvers as recent as 20 or 30 years ago, today there may be as many as 300 Zuni carvers that belong to a dozen or more noted Zuni artist families.

Leekya Zuni Horse Fetish

Leekya Zuni Horse Fetish

Laiwakete Zuni Horse Fetish

Laiwakete Zuni Horse Fetish

4 thoughts on “Native American Fetishes – Old and New

    • Thank you ! Fetishes are very interesting, aren’t they? I have 4 posts about heishi, which is an alternate popular spelling to hishi. If you go to the Category Jewelry and scroll down to Heishi, you will see 4 articles. Your query has prompted me to be sure to include alternate spellings in my keywords and elsewhere. Thanks for that !

      • I thought I had seen the topic before, but when I used the “search” button for “hishi”, I couldn’t find it. It’s good to know there is more than one way to spell it.

      • Great ! After I replied to your first note, I googled hishi and didn’t come up with much in the way of references to stone necklaces with that spelling but there were many other non-stone necklace uses of the word hishi. When I googled heishi, there were pages of results related to stone necklaces. So, I wonder what the origin of the spelling hishi is? Spanish perhaps? Or Asian? South Seas? Do you know? I know that heishi is the usual spelling when referring to southwest US Pueblo stone necklaces. I love to get to the bottom of word things, don’t you?

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