Can you Help me With OLD Bolo Hallmarks?

Hi Paula
I came by your information by chance and thought I would see if you could help me with some Native American jewelry Hallmarks on bolos.  First is a horse shoe type with an arrow over rays or other arrows. The other is a dancer with a simple hand engraved T I H. Both are quite old, somewhere between the 1930’s and perhaps early 1950’s.
Thank you,
Connie
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Hi Connie,
Both your Naja and Knifewing bolos seem to be quite old, with hand made bolo slides – before the popular Bennett bolo slide appeared on the scene.
First the Naja with an arrow and rays. Read more about the Naja here.
I don’t recognize the hallmark and do not see it in any of my hallmark reference books.
Next the Knifewing with TIH. Read more about Knifewing here.
I don’t recognize the hallmark and do not see it in any of my hallmark reference books.
I looked it up as you suggested with TIH and also as a cross followed by IH which is what it seems to me. I came up empty.
Perhaps a reader of this blog might recognize these old marks.
Paula

Silver Dollar Jewelry

Hi Paula,

I want to get my grandfather a silver dollar cuff and the one marked sold on your site is the one he really likes. Can you get another? Jan

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Hi Jan,

We never know when one will turn up in an estate lot. But if you have or buy a silver dollar that you like, you can have it made into a bracelet for your grandfather. The shop that does our repairs, Old Town Trading (contact info at the end of this post) can do that for you. Here is an example of a bolo that Henry, one of their silversmiths, made for one of their customers.

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Diane Radeke
Old Town Trading Co. / Jewels of the West
4009 N. Brown Ave.
Scottsdale, AZ  85251
602-350-4009

The Origin of the Bolo Tie

Origin of the Bolo Tie

Silversmith Victor Cedarstaff of Wickenburg, Arizona, claims to have invented the bolo tie in 1948.

According to an article in Sunset magazine:

Victor Cedarstaff was riding his horse one day when his hat blew off. Wary of losing the silver-trimmed hatband, he slipped it around his neck. His companion joked, “That’s a nice-looking tie you’re wearing, Vic.” An idea incubated, and Cedarstaff soon fashioned the first bola tie (the name is derived from boleadora, an Argentine lariat).

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Boleadoras or bolas (from Spanish bola, “ball”) are throwing weapons made of weights attached to the end of cords.

However, it is also said that the bolo tie is a North American pioneer creation that dates back to between 1866 and 1886. There is a bolo tie on display at a trading post in Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico, said to date back that far.

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A recent exhibit at The Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona entitled Native American Bolo Ties: Vintage and Contemporary generated renewed interest in bolos.

This is from the Heard Museum:

The distinctive tie originated in the Southwest, and its popularity quickly spread throughout the West and in many other parts of the country. The necktie has been made even more distinguished by contemporary American Indian artists in Arizona, who make bolo ties that are exquisite expressions of individuality and ingenuity.

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Bolo ties, representing the casual nature and somewhat rugged milieu of the West, emerged as a form of men’s neckwear in the 1940s. They directly countered business suits as well as the formality suits represented, and instead marked a different style and a different way of life. In particular, American Indian jewelers and silversmiths brought individuality and creativity to this art form, offering a broad range of unique and artistic options.

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Western wear, including the bolo tie, was popularized through 1950s television shows and movies. Some TV and movie personalities who brought scarf slides and bolo ties into the everyday vernacular include the Cisco Kid, Hopalong Cassidy and Roy Rogers. Bolo ties have been created by American Indian jewelers since the late 1940s and they continue to create them today.

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The bolo tie’s road to acquiring the status of Arizona’s official neckwear took place over several years. KOOL Channel 10’s anchor Bill Close and five other bolo tie enthusiasts met in 1966 at the Westward Ho Hotel in downtown Phoenix. From the beginning, their intent was to make the bolo tie a state emblem. Perhaps to help the cause, Arizona Highways Magazine devoted several pages of its October 1966 issue to Southwestern jewelry, including bolo ties. Help arrived when Governor Jack Williams proclaimed the first week of March 1969 as “Bolo Tie Week.” After several unsuccessful attempts, a bill making the bolo tie the official state neckwear was finally passed on April 22, 1971. The bolo tie is also the official neckwear of New Mexico and Texas, although Arizona was the first state to designate it as such.

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NOS – New Old Stock

We are often contacted by stores and trading posts that are closing and want to sell us their NOS – New Old Stock.

The items range from contemporary to vintage Native American items but still on the stores cards or packages.

Often they are of designs that aren’t currently available anymore and most of the time they are made of heavier sterling silver and with stones we don’t see as often any more…….so they are cool !

Even though they are not used, we put the NOS items in our pawn shop since we didn’t buy them from the artist directly and they usually are not contemporary items. So they seem to fit best in our pawn shop.

We’ve purchased some interesting inventories and collections over the last few years and I am finally listing some of it on the website.

Here are some examples of the NOS we have recently acquired: