Raven Crow Medicine

Lakota Kangi Pejuta Medicine Bag

Lakota Kangi Pejuta Medicine Bag. Kangi Pejuta means Medicine Crow.

RAVEN/CROW –  Raven and Crow are very similar in their strengths: both carry great responsibility to Spirit and are the messengers of magic and healing from the universe where all knowledge waits for us.

Raven Crow Feather Necklace by Apache artist Cynthia Whitehawk

NP574-feather-raven-whitehawk-2 Raven Crow Feather Necklace by Apache artist Cynthia Whitehawk

They also symbolize changes in consciousness, levels of awareness and perception.

Zuni Raven Fetishes

FF306-raven-pooacha-1 Zuni Raven Fetishes

Shamans, Spiritualists and Healers using Raven/Crow Medicine are able to use their gifts with deeper clarity, understanding and insight, developing greater power and skill in their abilities and their means to help one move forward in life.

Kangi Pejuta Smudge Kit

Kangi Pejuta Smudge Kit

Raven Crow Medicine Smudge Feather

Raven Crow Spirit Smudge fan by Apache artist Cynthia Whitehawk

Raven Crow Spirit Smudge fan by Apache artist Cynthia Whitehawk

Raven Crow Medicine Pouch

Raven Crow Medicine Pouch with hand carved and painted buffalo bone raven feather. Cynthia Whitehawk

 

Zuni Buffalo Fetish Carving
Raven – Crow – A symbol of Magic, Mystery, and a Shift in Consciousness
(from our conversations with Lakota and Apache healers)
Paula

Aren’t eagles endangered and isn’t it illegal to sell eagle feathers?

hello paula
i am interested in purchasing one of your smudge kits and i’m wondering what the ‘eagle’ feathers are?  are they really eagle feathers or something else.  just wondering since they’re endangered and it’s illegal to own one.
kristi

SK31-400wHi Kristi,

I answered this popular question in January of 2012. You can read it here Can Native Americans use Eagle Feathers…………..

Paula

Old Praying Feather – Can you help?

Hi Paula, I have in my possession a very old praying feather but cannot determine the origin or tribe in which it came, can I send you some pics about it and maybe you can help me with this. I was thinking maybe Hopi or Navajo but need to be sure.
This is very important to us because we want to bring it back to the tribe and it’s people where it belongs. We found it doing a trash out of a foreclosed property and it should be right to give it back.
Thanks. Tom
129 130 137 138 139 140Hi Tom,
I’ve seen fans like this made by Apache and Navajo.
Here is a similar style of Apache fan
CF53-hawk-1
Here is one made by a Navajo
SF806-turkey-pink-nash
It is possible it could also be a Plains tribe.
Perhaps one of the readers of this blog recognizes your fan.
Paula

Wyoming Sage for Smudging

White Sage (grown in California) seems to be the most common New Age sage used for smudging but the Plains Indians use the type of sage that grows native to South Dakota and Wyoming for their ceremonies.

Wyoming Sage

It is often called Wyoming sage or Black Hills sage. It has a powerful healing aroma. If you have never smudged with it, you might find it to be replacement or alternative to white sage.

Large Home Smudge Kit

Is burning incense the same as smudging?

HI Paula

I have moved into a new apartment recently, which I would love, if only negative things didn’t keep happening here.   A German friend of mine (we are all in the music business) is, like me, very interested in American Indian traditions, etc., and recommended sage smudging.   I am handicapped and a bit frightened to light any kind of fire in the home for the smoke, so bought some sage incense sticks which burn and smoke, so I hope they will do the same job, or rather, have the same outcome.   What do you think?
Best wishes,
Rosemary

Hi Rosemary,

It depends on how traditional you want to be about your smudging.

If you want to burn incense, that’s one thing. If you want to purify your surroundings in ceremony, that is quite something different.

Perhaps you haven’t read this article on our website:

http://www.horsekeeping.com/smudging/smudging-about.htm

Here is a place you can browse smudging supplies.

http://www.horsekeeping.com/smudging/smudging.htm

Smudge kit consisting of white sage, sweetgrass braid, a smudging bowl, a feather fan and a medicine bag in which to carry it all.

The Sacred Smoke Bowl Blessing – Smudging

The “Sacred Smoke Bowl Blessing” is a powerful Native American cleansing technique. It is a ritual to remove negativity. Smoke attaches itself to the negative energy and removes it to another space.

Cleansing is the word traditionally used, but you can think of it as a shift in energy from any bits of negativity to a more positive, peaceful state.

Smudging can be used to cleanse an object, a place, or your spirit, mind or body. Native Americans often use smudging in association with other ceremonies.

Contemporary uses includes purifying a new vehicle, your work area or a room or dwelling before moving in; purifying a sacred object such as stone, book or fetish; or for self-cleansing before meditation, prayer or sleep.

Certain plants are used for smudging. Smudging is done in a particular way. The herbs are burned in a small bowl or a shell, such as an abalone shell. The shell represents Water, a gift from the ocean. The smoke is distributed with a feather, a gift from our winged friends.

Catlinite Smudge Burner by Lakota artist, Alan Monroe

Native American Smudging – The Sacred Bowl Blessing

The Sacred Smoke Bowl Blessing – Smudging

Native American Smudge Feather Fans

©  2010 Horsekeeping © Copyright Information

The “Sacred Smoke Bowl Blessing” is a powerful Native American cleansing technique. It is a ritual to remove negativity. Smoke attaches itself to the negative energy and removes it to another space.

Cleansing is the word traditionally used, but you can think of it as a shift in energy from any bits of negativity to a more positive, peaceful state.

Smudging can be used to cleanse an object, a place, or your spirit, mind or body. Native Americans often use smudging in association with other ceremonies.

Contemporary uses includes purifying a new vehicle, your work area or a room or dwelling before moving in; purifying a sacred object such as stone, book or fetish; or for self-cleansing before meditation, prayer or sleep.

Certain plants are used for smudging. Smudging is done in a particular way. The herbs are burned in a small bowl or a shell, such as an abalone shell. The shell represents Water, a gift from the ocean. The smoke is distributed with a feather, a gift from our winged friends.

Herbs
Sage
For driving out negativity and for healing, White Sage is    preferred.

Sweetgrass
Sweetgrass is used for blessing after sage has been used.
It is an important part of Sioux and Cherokee ceremonies.     Sweetgrass is braided like hair.

Smudge Kit

A smudge kit contains herbs, a “bowl” or shell, and a feather to direct the smoke. The entire kit can be carried in a medicine bag.

Each part of the smudge kit and the smudging process signifies one of the four elements, that, when used, evokes the fifth element, life energy.

Native American Smudge Kit

Native American Smudge Kit

– The shell represents WATER
– The unlit herbs and ashes represents the EARTH
– The lit herb represents the FIRE
– The smoke represents the AIR

Smudging

Before you begin, be sure the area is well ventilated because the smoke, carrying the negative energy, must have an escape route.

Take normal precautions to prevent an unwanted fire, such as placing your smudge pot or shell on a non-combustible surface.

Gather your smudge kit and a means to light the herbs. Long wooden matches are the best because a candle can add dripping wax to the process and a lighter, is well, kind of out of character.

Light the herb and when a flame appears, put the herb out so it will smolder and smoke. Before you smudge another person, an object or a place, you should smudge yourself. You can do this by bringing the smoke to you and rolling it in swirls over your head, shoulders and around your body. Send the smoke away with the feather.

Native American Smudge Feather Fan

Native American Smudge Feather Fan

When smudging a place, such as a room or car, pay homage to the cardinal directions which include the east, west, north, south, up and down.

When you are finished smudging, extinguish sweetgrass by damping the braid against the shell. For sage, you can crush it against the bowl or shell or in a bowl of sand.

For more information

Sacred Smoke The Ancient Art of Smudging for Modern Times

Sacred Smoke The Ancient Art of Smudging for Modern Times