Looking for a Clement Honie Ring

Hi Paula,

I recently lost one of my favorite rings, a Clement Honie Kokopelli design that I bought in Zuni, New Mexico. So sad.  I saw the maze ring on your website but was wondering if you have any other Clement Honie designs in stock?

Thank you very much for your help!

Cheers,
Tracy

Hi Tracy,

As you have discovered, we have two styles of Clement Honie’s Man in the Maze rings.

Sterling Silver Man in the Maze ring by Clement Honie, Hopi
Sterling Silver Man in the Maze ring by Clement Honie, Zuni

We just got in some kokopelli rings by Calvin Peterson which might be what you are looking for.

Sterling Silver Kokopelli ring by Calvin Peterson, Navajo

 

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Native American Terms – Fetish, Totem, Amulet, Talisman

Paula,
I wondered why in your web store you describe some Indian animal carvings and jewelry pieces as fetishes and others amulets or totems. Are they all the same thing? – Stuart

Stuart,
The terms fetish, amulet, totem and talisman are often used interchangeably to describe an object that provides good fortune and protects from evil. The exact meaning of any of these terms depend on the culture and location in which it is used. Briefly, here is how I see them:

Talisman

Alaskan Thunderbird Talisman by David Audette from Sitka, Alaska

A talisman is an object that is considered to possess supernatural or magical powers and is used especially to avert evils, disease, or death. A talisman is typically engraved or cut with figures or characters, constellations, planets, or other heavenly signs. It is often worn as an amulet or charm. From the Greek word “telein”, which means “to initiate into the mysteries”. The word talisman is often used synonymous with amulet.

Amulet

Turquoise and Sterling Silver Lucky Horseshoe Amulet by Navajo artist Wilbur Muskett Jr.

An amulet is a protecting charm – any object worn to bring good luck and to ward off evil, illness, and harm from supernatural powers and from other people. Amulets are typically carvings, stones (especially with naturally occurring holes), plants (such as sage, 4-leaf clover, shamrock), coins, and jewelry (crosses, horseshoes, gemstones).

Totem

Horse Totem on Horse Spirit Medicine Bag by Apache artist Cynthia Whitehawk

A totem is an object that symbolizes a person’s or a tribe’s animal guide. This could be a totem pole, an emblem or a small figurine or carving. Native American tradition holds that different animal guides come in and out of a person’s life depending on the direction that person is headed and the challenges he faces. A totem animal is the one animal that acts as the main guardian spirit and is with a person for life, both in the physical and spiritual world. Traditionally, it is the totem animal, such as an eagle, wolf, bear, horse or dragonfly, that finds the person, not the other way around.

Fetish

Bear Fetish by Zuni artist Emery Eriacho

A fetish is a sacred object used in religious ceremonies, for spiritual awakening and to communicate with and direct supernatural powers. A fetish can provide protection, promote healing and ensure success in ventures such as hunting or farming. A Native American fetish is most often a carving, usually of an animal, that has some sort of power, and is sometimes decorated with stones, shells, and feathers. A carving without power is merely a carving. A person’s own beliefs determine the difference between a fetish and a carving.

So, whether an object is a talisman, totem, amulet or fetish is up to you. Just as the beauty of an object is in the eye of the beholder, so the power of an object is in the belief of the seer or wearer.

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Native American Hopi Sterling Silver Overlay

Native American Hopi Sterling Silver Overlay

©  2010 Horsekeeping © Copyright Information

The Hopi are Native Americans that live in northeastern Arizona surrounded by the Navajo reservation. The name Hopi is an abbreviation of Hopi’sinom which means “People who Live in the Correct Way”.

The Hopi religion is based on total reverence and respect for all things. The traditional life includes many cultural and religious ceremonies.

 

Hopi Sterling Silver Overlay Pendant

 

Their art and traditional crafts reflect their beliefs. They are noted for kachina dolls, pottery and jewelry, most notably silver overlay work.


Hopi Sterling Silver Overlay Bracelets

Hopi Sterling Silver Overlay Bracelets

With silver overlay, there are two layers of silver. The top layer is a scene, figures, or symbols meticulously cut out and then place on a solid silver layer.

The bottom layer is the background behind the cutouts and is traditionally darkened (oxidized) for contrast. In addition the same areas are usually etched with hashmarks.

The two layers are “sweated” together – that is, the silver is heated so that the two layers meld.

The result is a 3-D picture with great depth and interest.

 

Hopi Sterling Silver Overlay Belt Buckle

 

Native American Symbol – Man in the Maze

Man in the Maze

Stanley Gene  Navajo Sterling Silver Belt Buckle

The figure known as the “Man in the Maze,” depicts a man entering or exiting a labyrinth. It is a theme seen on baskets from as far back as the nineteenth century and in Hopi silver art. Such depictions of labyrinths are also found in ancient petroglyphs (Native American rock art).

The symbol can represent a person’s journey through life. The maze contains many twists and turns, meant to represent choices made in life. The center is round and dark, so the journey can be from darkness to light or vice versa depending on which way you are headed!

©  2010 Horsekeeping © Copyright Information

Some interpret the center as a representation of a person’s dreams and goals. When you reach the center, you have reached your goals and the sun god there blesses you and helps you pass into the next world.

Another interpretation of this symbol is that the man represents the human seed and the maze is the womb. As the man enters the maze, he creates new life which represents reincarnation or eternal life.

Hopi Man in the Maze items range from bracelets to belt buckles to earrings and more. They are characterized by a cutout overlay of the pattern with a dark oxidized background that traditionally is textured with hashmarks.

Navajo artists make Hopi style overlay pieces with the main difference being that the background is oxidized but not texturized.

Man in the Maze Navajo pendant

Man in the Maze Navajo pendant

 

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