Plains Pipe Feather Drop

 

Vintage Plains Pipe with Feather Drop

Once you have chosen your pipe bowl and stem, you can use them as is or dress them up with beads and feathers. See the end of this article for a list of other posts here on my blog about the Lakota chanunpa.

Lakota Four Winds Eagle Effigy Pipe made from sacred pipestone

Lakota made ash pipe stem

One traditional Plains addition is a feather drop which can be attached a number of ways and embellished as you see fit.

A feather drop can be attached to the stem in a number of ways.

 

Feather Drop – Turkey as Eagle

Feather Drop – Turkey as Raven

Feather Drop Details

 

Vintage Plains pipe

For more information, read my other related posts by clicking on the links below:

Native American Pipes – The Sacred Pipe
Lakota Four Winds Pipes
Sacred Red Pipestone from Minnesota

Paula

How Should I Decorate my Lakota Pipe and Stem?

Hi there all at Horsekeeping,

I have received my pipe bowl and pipe stem around two weeks ago now (thank you very much!) and have done nothing with the stem as yet. My animal totem is the Grizzly Brown bear, and wonder what decoration I should use. I feel that I should leave the pipe bowl untouched and treat the wood and decorate the stem only. I have thought about using some bead work on leather with the sacred hoop colours and using eagle feathers and (if attainable) bear fur. If I was to do this I think it may be difficult to attach if I treated the stem with say bees wax. Any suggestions?

CTP108-350w CTP-overview-700w

Kind regards

Phil

Hi Phil,
We feel you should look to your heart or your spiritual adviser or tribal leader for help in choosing how to adorn your pipe.
Beeswax would make it difficult to make things stick to the wood but often leather or pelts are laced onto the stem when the leather or hide is wet, so it shrinks tight onto the stem.

Paula

Sacred Catlinite Pipe – Oglala Lakota Chief with Bear Headress

This Chief in Headress pipe is made of solid sacred catlinite by fifth generation Oglala Lakota pipe maker Alan Monroe. The catlinite was mined from Alan Monroe’s mine at Pipestone National Monument in Pipestone Minnesota. The stone has been buffed and polished to a high gloss with beeswax.

AL’s talent working the stone is awesome. Visit the page to see more views.

Sacred Catlinite Pipe - Oglala Lakota Chief with Bear Headress by Alan Monroe

Bear is considered the most powerful of all of the animals and is one of the most popular subjects of Native American carvers. Bear is a spiritual guide and represents strength and self-knowledge. He has supernatural powers, great healing powers. Bear is a symbol deliberate action, introspection, soul and insight for the past and the future. Bear is the guardian of the West an is one of the animals of the Six Directions.