Could this possibly be a Zuni Bracelet?

In 1971 my cousin who lived in LA gave me a bracelet.  Only recently was it noted to me that it was a Zuni design.  Upon close inspection an inscription was found on the inside.  The letters S P Boone with Zuni below.  Was there a Zuni artist with this hallmark?  I am hoping you can assist me in this search to see if there is value in the bracelet.  Thanks in advance for any assistance you can give.
Living blessed,
Janice
KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

More from Janice…………In 1971 I was gifted by my cousin in LA this bracelet.  The only reference as to its origin is I remember his saying it was one of some items he had picked up while on a trip to Arizona or New Mexico.  I had admired it and a couple of other pieces.  He gave all the pieces to me.  He passed away 6 years ago, so I cannot get any background info from him.  The bracelet spent most of the last 42 years tucked into my jewelry box.
Recently I wore the bracelet for a special occasion and a friend noted it looked to be a Zuni bracelet.  I had no clue what that meant so she told me it was a quality piece of work by the Zuni tribe.  She looked at the bracelet and the inside had the initials S P Boone, with the ‘ne’ portion being linked together.  Below is zuni.
Age:  42 years +
Hallmark:  S P Boone Zuni
Weight:  .35g.
Dimensions:  2.5″ x .75″ that tapers down to an opening, 1.24″
Condition:  no cracks of missing stones
I know nothing other than what little I have researched online.  The bracelet displays a design I see on many of the inlaid Zuni pieces.
Is anyone familiar with the artist, S P Boone?
Hi Janice,
Although I have no information or knowledge about an SP Boone, the name Boone is a common Zuni name. We have a number of fetish carvings from the Boone family such as this jet horse by Emery Boone.
Jet horse with inlay by Zuni carver Emery Boone
And as you have discovered, that style of inlay is distinctively Zuni such as this bracelet by Zuni artist Quinton Bowannie
Zuni inlay bracelet by Quinton Bowannie
Paula

Native American Jewelry and Carving Materials – Jet

Paula,

One store owner here in Arizona calls jet a gemstone but I’m almost sure that isn’t correct – can you tell me if I am right or not?

Thanx, Jess

Hi Jess,

Good question ! Here’s my official answer.

Jet also known as Acoma Jet

Jet is an organic fossil – a solid, durable type of lignite coal that originated from wood.

Raw Jet

The term coal means the fossilized remains of ancient organic matter that ranges from bog materials to peat to wood. Jet, however, is the fossilized remains of araucaria (coniferous evergreen) wood specifically.


Therefore jet is not a stone or a mineral. It is fossilized wood.

You’d think jet is black……as in jet black……but actually it is very very dark brown but it appears black.

It is mined around the Acoma Pueblo region of New Mexico, among other places, thus the name Acoma Jet, or Jet for short.

Polished Jet

It can be highly polished. Therefore, it is very popular for carving fetishes. Here are some examples of Zuni Fetish carvings from jet.

Jet  is also used for inlaying but not usually used in large pieces for stone sets – if you see large black “stones”, they are usually black onyx.
Here are some examples of Zuni inlay pieces using jet.



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Native American Hair Accessories

Dear Paula,

My wife and I used to travel extensively in the southwest and collected some nice things which brings me to the hair pins that my wife has used for over 30 years and doesn’t know where to look to replace them. We no longer do much traveling so I was glad to find your website. Could you help me pick out some hair pins for my wife’s birthday? She has long hair and wears one pin on each side or one big one at the back.

P.S. Maybe you remember me from when I bought the small bracelets for my grand children which they wear non stop.

Thank you,   Eugene

Hi Eugene,

Of course I remember you and the group of children’s bracelets.……hello!

So now you are looking for a gift for your wife?  Well, lucky her !

Here are some ideas.

Native American Hair Accessories

Native American Hair Accessories

Depending on how thick your wife’s hair is and how much of it she pins back on each side, you could look at some very small barrettes (in matching pairs) that will hold the side wisps out of her eyes. I use these up at the top above my temples just to keep me from constantly pushing my hair our of my eyes.

Zuni Inlay Hair Barrettes

Zuni Inlay Hair Barrettes

If your wife likes to wear more of her hair pulled back on the sides almost like tucked behind her ears, you could choose medium barrettes or combs. But not every woman knows how to use hair combs or likes to use them, so you’d want to know that. If she likes barrettes, I’d stick with that.

Navajo Sterling Silver Feather Barrette

Navajo Sterling Silver Feather Barrette

Navajo SilverDust Hair Combs

Navajo SilverDust Hair Combs

For when she clips her hair at the back, you can look at a larger spring clip type barrette or a bun holder with pick which is also called a Stick Barrette.

Navajo Sterling Silver and Turquoise Hair Clip

Navajo Sterling Silver and Turquoise Hair Clip

Zuni Needlepoint Stick Barrette

Zuni Needlepoint Stick Barrette

And finally, there are pony tail clasps if your wife ever wears her hair pulled back at the nape of her neck on one hank. There are several sizes of these depending on how thick her hair is.


I hope this gives you some good ideas and don’t hesitate to write for more specific recommendations.

 

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Native American Symbols – Water Bird, Peyote Bird, Thunderbird

Native American Symbols

Water Bird, Peyote Bird, Thunderbird

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The Water Bird is a symbol of the renewal of life, rainy seasons, rivers, distant travel, distant vision & wisdom. It is often also referred to as the Peyote Bird because the Water Bird plays a significant part in the Native American Indian Church Peyote meetings and, in fact, since the early 1900′s has been the symbol of the NAC.

Peyote Bird

Peyote Bird

The Peyote/Water Bird is not a Southwest tradition, but one of the Plains Indians. The Peyote Bird is connected with lightning, thunder and visions. Those who dream of the thunder beings will become Heyokas, those who do things backwards, upside down, or opposite. This is a Lakota way of being. It is part of the medicine of the Heyoka to remind us that we should not take ourselves too seriously – that’s why Heyoka is often translated as the “sacred clown”.

Peyote - Water Bird

Peyote - Water Bird

The Thunderbird is a cross-cultural symbol of the Southwest, Plains and Pacific Northwest tribes as well as in the non-Native world. Much is written about the origin of the symbol and its significance. It has been suggested by some that the symbol was borrowed by Native American artisans from the white man’s medal dies. Others claim the Thunderbird has always lived in the mountains of the Pacific Northwest. There, carved totem poles are often topped with a Thunderbird with outstretched wings. Looking at a Thunderbird, it is easy to see why it symbolizes power, strength and nobility.

Zuni Inlay Thunderbird Pin Pendant by Randolph Lateyice

Zuni Inlay Thunderbird Pin Pendant by Randolph Lateyice

Thunderbird Pin Pendant by Zuni Rose Tekela

Thunderbird Pin Pendant by Zuni Rose Tekela

Zuni Inlay Thunderbird Pin Pendant by Leagus Ahiyite

Zuni Inlay Thunderbird Pin Pendant by Leagus Ahiyite

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