Raven Crow Medicine

Lakota Kangi Pejuta Medicine Bag

Lakota Kangi Pejuta Medicine Bag. Kangi Pejuta means Medicine Crow.

RAVEN/CROW –  Raven and Crow are very similar in their strengths: both carry great responsibility to Spirit and are the messengers of magic and healing from the universe where all knowledge waits for us.

Raven Crow Feather Necklace by Apache artist Cynthia Whitehawk

NP574-feather-raven-whitehawk-2 Raven Crow Feather Necklace by Apache artist Cynthia Whitehawk

They also symbolize changes in consciousness, levels of awareness and perception.

Zuni Raven Fetishes

FF306-raven-pooacha-1 Zuni Raven Fetishes

Shamans, Spiritualists and Healers using Raven/Crow Medicine are able to use their gifts with deeper clarity, understanding and insight, developing greater power and skill in their abilities and their means to help one move forward in life.

Kangi Pejuta Smudge Kit

Kangi Pejuta Smudge Kit

Raven Crow Medicine Smudge Feather

Raven Crow Spirit Smudge fan by Apache artist Cynthia Whitehawk

Raven Crow Spirit Smudge fan by Apache artist Cynthia Whitehawk

Raven Crow Medicine Pouch

Raven Crow Medicine Pouch with hand carved and painted buffalo bone raven feather. Cynthia Whitehawk

 

Zuni Buffalo Fetish Carving
Raven – Crow – A symbol of Magic, Mystery, and a Shift in Consciousness
(from our conversations with Lakota and Apache healers)
Paula

Aren’t eagles endangered and isn’t it illegal to sell eagle feathers?

hello paula
i am interested in purchasing one of your smudge kits and i’m wondering what the ‘eagle’ feathers are?  are they really eagle feathers or something else.  just wondering since they’re endangered and it’s illegal to own one.
kristi

SK31-400wHi Kristi,

I answered this popular question in January of 2012. You can read it here Can Native Americans use Eagle Feathers…………..

Paula

Old Praying Feather – Can you help?

Hi Paula, I have in my possession a very old praying feather but cannot determine the origin or tribe in which it came, can I send you some pics about it and maybe you can help me with this. I was thinking maybe Hopi or Navajo but need to be sure.
This is very important to us because we want to bring it back to the tribe and it’s people where it belongs. We found it doing a trash out of a foreclosed property and it should be right to give it back.
Thanks. Tom
129 130 137 138 139 140Hi Tom,
I’ve seen fans like this made by Apache and Navajo.
Here is a similar style of Apache fan
CF53-hawk-1
Here is one made by a Navajo
SF806-turkey-pink-nash
It is possible it could also be a Plains tribe.
Perhaps one of the readers of this blog recognizes your fan.
Paula

Native American Award for Valor, Courage and Bravery

Is there a Native American symbol awarded to great warriors for valor, courage, and bravery in battle much like the Silver or Bronze Stars awarded to soldiers? If not, can you make a suggestion? Thank you very much.

Wess

Hi Wess,

A Lakota friend of mine sent me this. I hope it is helpful. You can browse our feather hair ties here. Feather Hair Ties. Paula

Recommendation for Protection against Evil and Bad Luck

Hello,

My friend is interested in a native indian amulet or “charm” for protection against evil and bad luck.  Would these medicine bags be appropriate?  I specificially like the Crazy Horse bag with the gemstones, however, I am not sure about their spiritual powers or purpose.  Would you please be able to direct me to the proper item that I could buy for my friend.

Thank you. IJ

Hi IJ,

Every person has their own belief system when it comes to good spirits and good luck so it is not so important what is used, but what one believes. Picking up a special stone can do more to change one’s luck than purchasing a lottery ticket !!

With that said, you know your friend and his or her habits and propensity to ceremony and ritual. Here are some ideas.

The Crazy Horse bag is very nice.

Crazy Horse Bag by Apache artist Cynthia Whitehawk

I’d highly recommend any of the bags made by Apache artist, Cynthia Whitehawk as she makes each of her items in ceremony and with great attention to detail. They are filled with a wonderful spirit already !  She acknowledges that each of us tends to be drawn to certain animals, stones or other healing spirits, so she makes many bags and shares her thoughts on the protective and healing powers of each totem.  That is indicated at the bottom of each page describing the bag.

Eagle Spirit Bag by Apache artist Cynthia Whitehawk

Carved Zuni fetishes can also be very powerful talismans – many are suitable to carry in a pocket or purse making them handy to hold or rub.

Rainbow Calsilica Medicine Bear by Zuni artist Kenny Chavez

Some of these fetishes are available as pendants so they can be worn on a chain or leather choker.

Sacred White Buffalo Pendant by Zuni artist Cheryl Beyuka

A cross might be the perfect answer.

Sterling Silver and Turquoise Cross by Navajo artist Derrick Gordon

For those who are looking for good luck, such as would come from a finding a four leaf clover, there are Authentic Lucky Horseshoes.

Authentic Lucky Horseshoe

I hope I’ve given you some ideas to find the perfect item for your friend.

Can Native Americans use Eagle and Hawk Feathers in their Art?

Hi Paula

I have a few questions about dream catchers. My sister brought a couple back recently and quarantine insisted on irradiating them. That was fine until they folded all the feathers to pack them in the post! So, am I correct in assuming that you can just replace the feathers with new ones? I dont recall ever reading about any ritual observances during a dream catchers making (its a navajo one and I dont even know if dream catchers are traditional in that culture)? I dont know what kind of feathers they are – am I right that they cannot be eagle or hawk due to your laws, or are indigenes allowed to use them in their art? Is the type of feather used significant? Thanks Paula and have a nice day

regards
Merideth from Australia

Apache Dreamcatcher with barred pea hen feathers

Hi Meredith,

Eagle, hawk and many other types of feathers are illegal to own. Some Native Americans are allowed to use them in religious ceremony but can’t sell them alone or as part of a piece of artwork because non-registered Native Americans can’t posses them.

Here is an article about a recent court ruling.

Only Indians Can Use Eagle Feathers for Religious Practices, Court Rules

To obtain eagle feathers for religious ceremonies, Native Americans can’t collect their own feathers. They must get them through a Federal Repository.  We have one here in Denver which you can read about. It is very interesting.

So most NA artists use pea hen, turkey etc. and either use them as is or paint them to be faux eagle, faux hawk, owl etc.

Lakota Imitation Red-Tailed Hawk Feather

Lakota Imitation Eagle Feather


So,  if feathers have been damaged they can be replaced with feathers that are significant to the person who owns the dreamcatcher – some use macaw, pheasant, goose……all sorts are used – it is what they are meant to represent that is important.

Dreamcatchers are usually associated with the Woodland and Plains tribes and some southwest, like Apache, but not usually Navajo, although Navajo make dreamcatcher jewelry.

I’ll be listing some amazing Apache dreamcatchers next week, resplendent with feathers, so watch the NEW page where all the new items appear first.

http://www.horsekeeping.com/new-items.htm

Paula

Native American Feather Hair Ornament

Hello Paula

I would like to get a feather to wear on the side of my hair – however my hair is very fine and “thinning.” I have it cut to below ears in a “bob.” In looking at feather ornaments on your site I do not see how I could fasten one into my hair – looks like most are for ponytails, etc. Also, I would like the feather not to hang down too far. Would appreciate your advice. Thank you.

Hello !

Well, we have two types of feather hair ornaments. One type is an actual feather made into a feather hair tie. This is a Lakota tradition and the hair ties we have are made by Oglala Lakotas from South Dakota. Here is an example of some of the shorter ones we have but you can click on the photo and it will take you to the page with our current selection.

If I were affixing this type of hair ornament to my hair so it would hang down on the side like we see all the time on today’s celebrity singers and dancers, I’d section off a small bundle of hair underneath, fasten the hair tie to the hair bundle near the roots with one of those tiny rubber bands and then let the rest of your hair surround the feather so it peeks out when your hair moves.

As far as what length would work for you, the best way to determine that is with a ruler and a paper cut out in the approximate shape of a feather – hold it in place and see how it looks.

Lakota Hair Ties

As far as sterling silver hair ornaments, or barrettes, yes we have some beautiful feathers but they are quite long and some are heavy, made to hold back a large hank of hair at the nape of the neck.

They are over 3″ long and would be difficult to use as you are hoping for.

Sterling Silver Feather Barrette by Carson Blackgoat over 4″ long

Sterling Silver and Turquoise Feather Barrette by Milton Vandever – over 3″ long

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